Commission of William G. D. Worthington as Acting Governor of
East Florida
July 1, 1821

Florida Territorial Papers
Andrew Jackson, Governor of Florida.
To all to whom these Presents shall come greeting.

Whereas, the Congress of the United States, by an act passed on the third day of March, 1821, did provide, that until
the end of the first session of the next Congress, unless provision be sooner made for the temporary government of the
Territories of East and West Florida, ceded by Spain to the United States by the Treaty between the said parties
concluded at Washington on the 22ed day of February 1819, all the military, civil and judicial powers exercised by the
officers of the existing Government of the Same, shall be vested in such person and persons and shall be exercised by
the officers of the existing Government of the Same, shall be vested in such person and persons and shall be exercised
in such manner, as the President of the United States shall direct, for maintaining the inhabitants of said territories in the
free enjoyment of their liberty; property, and religion: And Whereas, I, Andrew Jackson, have been duly appointed to
exercise within the said ceded Territories, under such limitations as have been or may be hereafter prescribed to me by
the President, and by law, all the powers and authorities heretofore exercised by the Governor and Captain General,
and the Intendant of Cuba, and by the Governors of East and West Florida within the said Provinces respectively: now
Know Ye, that in virtue of the above powers, I do by these presents appoint William G. D. Worthington, to exercise within
all that part of the ceded territory and the Islands adjacent thereto situated to the East of Cape Florida, all the powers
and authorities heretofore exercised by the Governor of East Florida within the said Territory; and I do empower him the
said William G. D. Worthington, to fulfil and execute the duties of his present appointment in conformity to such
instructions as he may receive from me, and according to law, and to have and to hold the same with all its powers and
priviliges, until the end of the next session of Congress, unless provision be sooner made for the temporary government
of the same, or unless revoked by me me: Provided, nevertheless, and it is the true intent and meaning of these
presents, that the said William G. D. Worthinton, or any person acting under him shall have no power or authority to lay
or collect any new or additional Taxes, or to grant or confirm to any person or persons whomsoever any title or claim to
land within the same.

Given under my hand and private seal (having no Seal of office) at the city of Pensacola on the first day of July --- A. D.
1821, and of the independence of the united States of America the Forty fifth.

Signed Andrew Jackson

By the Governor
R, K, Call, Ac' Sec of W Florida
Countersigned by, Capt R. K Call Secretary & Aid de Camp
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