Return to Dr. Bronson's St. Augustine History
The Battle of Braddock Farm
(Dunn's Lake)
February 1865
The fight near Braddock's Farm is really two incidents in one for the Union and one outing for the
Confederates. It represents second loss of a St. Augustine commander in months and the second loss of a
commander of the
Connecticut 17th Regiment. For the south it represents the ability of the Confederates even
at this late date in the war to stage a significant raid behind Union lines and escape with prisoners and supplies
across the St. Johns River.


From Dickison and His Man by Mary Elizabeth Dickison (his wife)( Edited)
FIGHT NEAR BRADDOCK FARM IN VOLUSIA COUNTY.
Until February, 1865, Captain Dickison, as post- commander, had heavy duty to perform - the enemy
continually making demonstrations for another invasion, and requiring all the strategic skill of our little force to
keep them in check. Our outposts, near
Green Cove Springs, Palatka, and up the St. John's river as far as
Volusia county, were kept constantly engaged.

Learning from his scouts on the east side of the river that the force of the enemy's garrison at Picolata was
about four hundred strong, and were becoming very troublesome and insulting to our loyal citizens, Captain
Dickison at once resolved on an expedition across the river if he could gain the consent of his commanding
general, and arrange some plan for the relief and protection of these unfortunate people. He telegraphed the
general, asking permission to cross the river with his command. The general replied that he would leave it to his
good judgment, but to be very cautious as the enemy were in large force at
Jacksonville, Green Cove Springs
and St. Augustine, with their gunboats in the river.

He at once decided to cross the river and reconnoiter near the enemy's stronghold. He ordered his men to
prepare five days' rations, as he could not take any transportation farther than the river. His cavalry consisted of
detachments from his Company H of sixty-four men, under Lieutenants McCardell and McEaddy, thirty-three
from Company B of the same regiment, under Lieutenant McLeod, and twenty- eight from Company H of the
Fifth Battalion of Cavalry.

His destination was not confided to his command until he reached the St. John's river, as it was well known that
danger and great risk attended this movement.

(Editor's note: This took place on the 4th and 5th of February) On the 8th of February, just at sunset, they
reached the deserted city of Palatka, the objective point to cross the river. He then formed his men into line,
and in a few words made it known to them that he intended crossing over into the enemy's lines.

He said: " My brave soldiers, we are going to cross the river tonight. I expect to lead you where there is
danger. We must protect our friends on the east side of the river. The wagons will return to Waldo, and if there
is a man who does not wish to follow me, he can return with the wagons."

The distance across the river was one mile, their only transportation one flatboat, that could carry but twelve
men and horses. They were all night and until ten o'clock the next morning making the passage over, where they
all landed safe and in fine spirits. They had a long and circuitous route to march to reach Picolata, their march
continuing until two o'clock that night.

When within one mile of the fort, Captain Dickison called a halt. He ordered that a young soldier in his
command, whose father lived inside the picket lines, be summoned, and asked if he thought he could manage to
pass through the picket line with a message to his father that he wished to see him. Like a truly brave soldier, he
accepted the trust, and soon returned accompanied by his worthy parent, who, in conversation with the captain,
informed him that the enemy had been re-enforced that day with about four hundred men, and had several
pieces of artillery in position on the fort. With such reliable information, he knew it would be only a sacrifice of
his brave little command to attack this stronghold without artillery. The same informant reported that, at a
certain house on the road from Jacksonville to St. Augustine, also leading from
Picolata, there was to be a large
assembly of the people that night from St. Augustine and
Jacksonville for a dance, and, as many of the fair sex
would grace the occasion, there would be a goodly company of Federal officers and young soldiers in
attendance, having no apprehension of an attack from " Dixie," the pet name given by them to Captain Dickison.

About twelve miles off, on the road to this house, was a station where several soldiers and horses were kept.
The captain sent down his line to arouse his men, who, from loss of rest after a long and toilsome march, would
often fall asleep as soon as a halt was ordered. Soon they were all ready to march, and moved on with great
rapidity to reach, if possible, each respective place before daylight.

Arriving at the station, they came upon twelve Federal cavalry with as many horses; all were made prisoners in
quick time. Then on they pressed toward the banquet hall.

Placing a detachment on the road leading to St. Augustine, and one on the road to
Jacksonville, just at the
dawn of day Captain Dickison moved up in the rear. As he drew near the house he saw two officers, a major
with his adjutant, riding off. He dashed up to them and demanded a surrender, which was not refused. These
officers belonged to the garrison at Picolata. Then on to the house our command rushed.

Several soldiers, with one captain and one lieutenant, were captured. Our boys, who were awaiting them by the
roadside, next captured the band of musicians, composed of twelve young soldiers, in a fine four-horse
ambulance, on their way to St. Augustine. They were ordered to halt by our young vigilantes, who said: "We
want that carriage to take a ride." We captured at the two places about forty men, including four officers, also
eighteen horses and one fine ambulance.

While at this place, Captain Dickison learned, through a reliable source, that Colonel Wilcoxon, with the
Seventeenth Connecticut and ten large six-mule wagons had gone up the road, known as the old Government
road, in the direction of Volusia county. Dividing his command, taking fifty-two men with one lieutenant to
follow in pursuit of Colonel Wilcoxon, leaving the remainder, under  Lieutenants Haile, Haynes and McCardell,
with the guard in charge of the prisoners, with orders to move on by the way of Haw's creek and meet him at
or near Braddock's farm, about six miles east of the river, he rapidly proceeded with his detachment, Lieutenant
McEaddy commanding the advance guard.

They had marched but a few miles when Lieutenant McEaddy met a detachment of cavalry under Captain
Staples, and a sharp engagement took place. He captured one man and two horses, the others making their
escape in the swamp near by. Upon reaching the main road, it was very evident that the report given was
correct, the road being cut up by the wagons, and signs of the enemy having passed.

A bright moonlight smiling upon them, they continued to press forward until midnight, when they reached a small
farmhouse. Some of the command informed the captain that two of the occupants were deserters from our
army.

He ordered a halt. Leaving Lieutenant McEaddy in command, he advanced with ten men to the house, and
surrounded it before he was discovered.

The madam came out and met the captain, who passed for a Federal colonel, his ten men wearing blue
overcoats. He addressed her as a rebel woman. She assured him she was a loyal Union woman, that her two
sons had deserted from the Confederate army and were then concealed in the swamp, and would remain there
until they could hear that Dickison had recrossed the river, as they had been routed by his men two nights
before.

The captain informed her that he was then on his way with his cavalry to protect Colonel Wilcoxon in the rear.
She replied that the colonel had rested there the day before and dined with her. Just then some of our command
rode up who were not attired in blue overcoats. Fearing that she would discover the deception, as they were
dismounting and coming in the yard for water, he called her attention to them, and remarked, " they are some of
Dickison's men we have captured," at the same time ordering his men in blue to guard the prisoners well and
not let one escape. With an earnest " God bless you, Colonel," from her patriotic heart, she threw her arms
around him and begged him to capture " that man Dickison." He replied: "I will get him before he crosses the
river."

Some of the men were at the barn getting fodder. She appealed to the supposed colonel to protect her stores.
He walked to the gate, accompanied by her, and ordered his men not to take that fodder, as it belonged to a
good Union woman. " Oh, if they need it, let them have it;" she said. He then promised her payment for the
same.

When ready to leave the house, another difficulty arose. He had only Confederate money to offer her, and this
currency had no value on that side of the river. He extricated himself from this dilemma by a promise that when
the wagons returned, he would direct his quartermaster to furnish her supplies of flour and coffee as an
equivalent. With reiterated blessings, she clasped him in another and warmer embrace, with all the strength of
her two hundred pounds, honest weight. He then bade her a tender farewell, with a renewal of his promises.

An old Union woman embracing their captain for a Federal officer, was too amusing an incident not to be
enjoyed by his men. Their sense of the ridiculous was too keen to be held in abeyance, and for the time their
merriment gained the mastery.

After moving on a few miles, a halt was ordered for an hour, and, with our scant rations, both men and horses
were refreshed.

We continued our march, every few miles meeting deserters on their way to St. Augustine. Captain Dickison
riding at the head of his advance, his men still wearing blue overcoats, on coming up, would address them as
rebels. They would deny the charge, declaring they had deserted from the Confederate army and were good
Union men.

As they had passed Colonel Wilcoxon and his command, they gave all the information we desired to gain about
the strength of his force, and were then sent to the rear as prisoners.

On the evening of the third day, when within two miles of Wilcoxon, we met two deserters in carts driving on
the road to the ancient city. The captain, with a similar stratagem, learned that they were just from Colonel
Wilcoxon's headquarters, at Braddock's farmhouse, only two miles distant, and that they were making ready to
start with their wagons loaded with cotton.

They also stated that Wilcoxon had inquired of them if they knew anything of Dixie, and that they had reported
him as last heard from at Waldo.

Captain Dickison then advanced a little nearer, halted, and arranged his little command for a desperate
encounter, as he well knew the enemy outnumbered us two to one, and their regiment a fine and well disciplined
one.

He said to his men: "We will, in a few minutes, meet a force superior to us in numbers; are you willing to follow
me?" In proud tones they replied: "We will follow you wherever you lead."

He then gave order to Lieutenant McEaddy, the only commanding officer with him, except his surgeon, Dr.
Williams: " Keep your men in good line to take ready for the charge. I will ride at the head of the advance, and
at the signal, a wave of my handkerchief, you will charge up."

Moving on slowly and with great caution, his surgeon by his side, he saw the enemy at some distance moving
down a long hill with a heavy train of wagons.

He could see them marching along in no particular order by the side of the wagons, having no advance guard,
as they had just left their headquarters.

A branch being between the enemy and our men, he ordered our advance, consisting of ten men, under the
gallant Sergeant William Cox, to dismount and take a position at the branch and await orders.

The enemy halted, not over one hundred and fifty yards distant, and our advance, under the excitement, fired
into them without orders. Captain Dickison then ordered his brave boys to make a charge. The heart of any
commander would have thrilled with proud delight at the splendid heroism they displayed. They fought as only
brave men fight.

Charging up to the long line of wagons, under a heavy fire, they pressed on until the enemy gave way, and fell
back to the woods pursued by our intrepid dragoons. The captain demanded a surrender, ordering them to
throw down their arms. This was all done before they had time to learn the strength of our force. As we passed
the wagons in the charge, Captain Dickison said to his surgeon: "Remain with the wagons, and stop our
advance as they come up."

At this juncture, Lieutenant McEaddy, in making ready for a charge, struck a pond around which he, with a few
of his command, made the charge, Colonel Wilcoxon, with his staff and a detachment of twenty cavalry, being
at that moment ready to meet him. They charged down the hill upon our men, coming up near where the
prisoners had surrendered.

Our command then fired into the colonel's escort, who dashed off on the road toward the wagons, where a
lively fight ensued, our surgeon and Sergeant Cox, with ten men, killing and capturing every one except Colonel
Wilcoxon. He fought fearlessly ; after firing his last shot, he threw his pistol at one of our soldiers, then drew his
sword and started down the road, where two or three men were guarding the prisoners. There was but one
way for him to make his escape, between this guard and Captain Dickison, who was on the watch, fearing the
prisoners would revolt. Seeing this officer approaching, not knowing who he was, he rode on to meet him, and
demanded a surrender. Driven to desperation, he drew his sword and made a furious charge at the captain,
who fired, the shot taking effect in his left side.

As their horses were moving rapidly, they passed each other. Captain Dickison quickly turned and soon gained
upon his adversary, whose glittering sword flashed defiance. Again the captain fired with sure aim, the saber
strokes falling heavy and fast. One more shot, and his antagonist fell. At this moment one of our men rode up,
and the wounded man was left in his care.

The fight ended. Captain Dickison," on inquiring, learned that Colonel Wilcoxon was not among the prisoners.
He looked in the direction he had left the wounded officer and saw him approaching, leaning upon the arm of
the young guard, who called to Captain Dickison that Colonel Wilcoxon desired to see him. The captain
dismounted to meet him, with an emotion that stirs the heart of every brave man, for " the bravest are the
tenderest," and addressed him : " Colonel, why did you throw your life away?" The colonel, with true manhood,
replied: "Don't blame yourself, you are only doing your duty as a soldier ; I alone am to blame."

Our noble surgeon soon came up and greeted the unfortunate officer as a brother, united by the " mystic tie."
He was tenderly cared for and wrapped in the Standard of the Masonic Brotherhood, one of the noblest orders
that ever enlisted the sympathies or engaged the services of mankind, bearing no stain of blood nor mark of
carnage upon its fair folds, but consecrated to God and suffering humanity. He was faithfully ministered to by
true and brave hearts until his ear was deaf to earth's rude alarms, and the weary spirit peacefully departed to
its eternal rest. Our victory was a decided and brilliant one. The entire command was captured, about
seventy-five in number; four were killed and a few wounded. Their wagon-train consisted of ten fine wagons,
each with six mules and horses, with best equipments, all loaded with Sea Island cotton that had been stolen
and stored at Braddock's farm. We captured also, all their fine cavalry horses, some of them the best in the
Federal army. Not a man hurt on our side.

We were about eight or ten miles from the St. John's river, and up to this time had heard nothing of Lieutenant
McCardell's command, which had left us three days previous with instructions to meet our detachment at or
near this place. Considerable anxiety prevailed in regard to their safety, increased by the great difficulty to be
met in making a successful crossing of the river with our force, and so large a capture.

We moved on for about three miles. Night coming on, a halt was ordered. Captain Dickison then sent a
detachment of four men to a crossing known as " Horse Landing," about six miles off, to order the flatboat
brought over by the time he would reach the landing next morning. Before crossing the river, he had directed
Captain McGahaghan, who was at Horse Landing with an infantry company of reserves, for the purpose of
removing the machinery of the gunboat Columbine, we had captured at that point, to be ready to assist him,
when he returned from his expedition.

Early next morning, on our arrival at the landing, we found the boat ready.

The position being a very critical one, apprehending that the enemy would soon follow with a large force to cut
us off, an almost impenetrable swamp to our right and the broad St. John's in front giving them the advantage,
called forth all.

He fully understood the difficulties of the situation. He knew, should Lieutenant McCardell come up, he would
then have about two hundred and fifty men and over two hundred horses, with ten heavily-loaded wagons and
two ambulances, to be crossed over to the western side of the river, and his only transportation, one flatboat,
with capacity to carry one wagon or twelve men and horses.

Fortunately, the infantry company of about seventy men, on the opposite shore, would render valuable
assistance in unloading each transport. He then made a detail of three detachments, sufficiently strong to
manage the boat, and respectively take command.

At ten o'clock a. m. they began their difficult and arduous task. The prisoners were first sent over, then the
captured wagons and horses, until all were safely landed. Day and night these dauntless men worked with such
caution and accuracy, not a mistake was made either in loading or discharging. The boat was never stopped
until the last man, horse and wagon were safely landed on the west side of the St. John's river.
While this grand and most remarkable transit was going on, a courier reported that Lieutenant McCardell and
command were all safe and would soon be up. On their arrival, they gave most efficient help to our tired men,
who had so often crossed and recrossed the river in performance of their arduous and perilous duty.
By eleven o'clock the next morning, a period of only twenty-five hours, the last boat landed, bearing our noble
captain. Long repeated shouts of welcome greeted him, and glad hosannas arose from every grateful heart.

After ten days from the time Captain Dickison left his headquarters, he returned with his command.

The bearer of these dispatches was the gallant young
Ambler, a member of Company H, whose fearlessness
and remarkable executive ability admirably fitted him for any important trust. Loved and respected by his
captain and fellow soldiers, he was, on many occasions, sent as courier where great promptness and fidelity
were especially called for.

On this memorable occasion, as on every other, he was not found wanting, and soon the electric current did its
heaven-directed work. The wires flashed joy into every heart, and loud peans were heard from every home in
this " land of flowers," and the good tidings borne to our sister States made glad the whole Southland, for all
hearts beat as one that were enlisted in our sacred cause.

Headquarters South Florida Force
Waldo, East Florida, February 9, 1865


MAJOR: I have the honor respectfully to report that on the morning of the 1st instant I left this encampment
with the following detachment of my command: Company H, 2nd Florida Ca., 64 men, commanded by
Lieutenant's McCardell & McEaddy; Company B, of the same regiment, 33 men, commanded by Lieutenant
McLeod; Company H, 5th Fla. Battalion, 23 men commanded by Lieutenant Hayes, Brantley, and Haile. On
the evening of the 2nd instant I crossed the St. John's River at
Palatka and moved in the direction of Picolata.
When within a mile of the post I found it impractical to make a successful attack. I then made a flank move in
the direction of St. Augustine and Jacksonville, where I captured 17 prisoners, including a captain and
lieutenant, with an ambulance. I then learned that a raiding party had left St. Augustine for Valencia. Dividing my
command into two parties, sending one by the King's Road toward Pellicer Creek, the other by Cowpen
Branch, my advance met a small party of the enemy and captured one of them. We continued our march and
met the enemy at Braddock's Farm, where I engaged them, taking 51 prisoners (including a Lt. Col. & 2
captains), killing 4 men (including the adjutant), also 18 deserters & Tories, 10 wagons & teams with seed
cotton (about 9,000 pounds), and a number of small arms and horses. I re-crossed the river on the 6th instant
without the loss of a man.

My officers and men behaved most gallantly, & deserve the highest praise for their conduct & obedience to
orders. The march was very hard & fatiguing, having undergone hard travel both day & night to accomplish my
design.

I sent in all 68 Yankee prisoners and 18 deserters. All of which is respectfully submitted.

I am, Major, yours respectfully,

J.J. Dickison
Captain, Commanding Forces

Captain J. J. Dickison's account from his book on Florida Military History entitled Florida:
On the 2d of February, 1865, just at sunset, they reached the deserted city of Palatka. He then formed his men
and made known to them that he intended crossing over into the enemy's lines. Not one of the heroic little band
faltered in his duty or desired to turn back. The distance across the river was one mile, their only transportation
one flatboat that could carry but twelve men and horses. They were all night and until 10 o'clock the next
morning making the passage over, but landed safely and in fine spirits. They had a long and circuitous route to
march to reach Picolata, continuing until 2 o'clock that night. When within one mile of the fort a halt was called
and a young soldier in the command, whose father lived inside the Federal lines, was detailed to pass through
the picket line and bring out his father. This hazardous duty was performed and the worthy parent informed
Captain Dickison that the enemy had been [124] reinforced that day with about 300 men and had several
pieces of artillery in position on the fort. It was apparent that it would be futile to attack this strong post without
artillery; but the same informant reported there was to be a large assembly of the people that night for a dance,
from St. Augustine and
Jacksonville, and that about 12 miles off, on the road to the house of entertainment, was
a station where several soldiers and horses were kept. Sending down his line to arouse the men, who, after long
and toilsome marches, would often fall asleep as soon as a halt was ordered, Dickison moved on rapidly to
reach if possible each place before daylight. Arriving at the station, they captured the 12 Federal cavalry with as
many horses, and then pressed on to the banquet hall.

Placing a detachment on the road leading to Jacksonville and one on the road to St. Augustine, just at the dawn
of day Captain Dickison moved up in the rear. As he drew near the house he saw two officers, a major with his
adjutant, riding off. He dashed up to them and demanded a surrender. These officers belonged to the garrison
at Picolata. At the house, several soldiers, with 1 captain and 1 lieutenant, were captured. The detachment by
the roadside captured the band of musicians, composed of 12 young soldiers, in a fine four-horse ambulance,
on their way to St. Augustine. They were ordered to halt, our boys saying, "We want that carriage to take a
ride." At these places were captured about 40 men, including 4 officers, also 18 horses and 1 ambulance.
Dickison now learned that Colonel Wilcoxson, with the Seventeenth Connecticut and ten large six-mule
wagons, had gone up the road in the direction of Volusia county. Dividing his command he took 52 men with
one lieutenant to follow in pursuit of Colonel Wilcoxson, leaving the remainder under Lieutenants Haile, Haynes
and McCardell with the guard in charge of the prisoners, with orders to move on by the way of Haw's creek
and [125] meet him at or near Braddock's farm, about 6 miles east of the river. He then rapidly proceeded with
his detachment. They had marched but a few miles when Lieutenant McEaddy, commanding the advance, met
a detachment of cavalry under Captain Staples and captured 1 man and 2 horses, the others making their
escape in the swamp near by. Upon reaching the main road, a bright moonlight smiling upon them, they
continued to press forward until midnight, when a halt was ordered for an hour. They continued their march,
every few miles meeting deserters on their way to St. Augustine. Gaining all the information desired from them
they were sent to the rear as prisoners. On the evening of the third day they learned from two deserters who
were just from Wilcoxon's headquarters at Braddock's farmhouse, only 2 miles distant, that they were making
ready to start back their wagons loaded with cotton. Captain Dickison then advanced a little nearer, halted, and
arranged his little command for a desperate encounter, as he well knew the enemy outnumbered him two to
one, their regiment a fine and well disciplined one. Lieutenant McEaddy, the only commissioned officer with him
except his surgeon, Dr. Williams, was directed to keep his men in good line, ready for the charge, the signal to
be given to him from the head of the advance by a wave of his handkerchief.

Moving on slowly, his surgeon by his side, he saw the enemy at some distance moving down a long hill with a
heavy train of wagons. He could see them marching along in no particular order by the side of the wagons,
having no advance guard, as they had just left their headquarters. A branch being between the enemy and our
men, he ordered our advance, consisting of 10 men under Sergt. William Cox, to dismount and take position at
the branch and await orders. The enemy halted not over 150 yards distant, and our advance under the
excitement fired into them without orders. They [126] were then ordered to make a charge. The heart of any
commander would have thrilled with proud delight at the splendid heroism they displayed. They fought as only
brave men fight. Charging up to the long line of wagons under a heavy fire, they pressed on until the enemy gave
way and fell back to the woods, pursued by our intrepid dragoons. The captain demanded a surrender,
ordering them to throw down their arms. This was all done before they had time to learn the strength of our
force. As we passed the wagons in the charge Captain Dickison directed his surgeon, Dr. Williams, to remain
with the wagons and stop our advance as they came up. At this juncture Lieutenant McEaddy, in making ready
for a charge, struck a pond, around which he with a few of his command made the charge, Colonel Wilcoxson
with his staff and a detachment of 20 cavalry being at that moment ready to meet him. They charged down the
hill upon our men, coming up near where the prisoners had surrendered. Our command then fired into the
colonel's escort which dashed off on the road toward the wagons, where a lively fight ensued, our surgeon and
Sergeant Cox with 10 men killing and capturing every one, except Colonel Wilcoxson. He fought fearlessly.
After firing his last shot he threw his pistol at one of our soldiers, then drew his sword and started down the
road where 3 men were guarding the prisoners. There was but one way for him to make his escape, between
this guard and Captain Dickison, who was on the watch, fearing the prisoners would revolt. Seeing this officer
approaching, not knowing who he was, he rode on to meet him, and demanded a surrender. Driven to
desperation, the Federal drew his sword and made a furious charge at Dickison, who fired, the shot taking
effect in his left side. As their horses were moving rapidly they passed each other. Dickison quickly turned and
soon gained upon his adversary, whose glittering sword flashed defiance. Again he fired with sure aim, the
saber strokes [127] falling fast. One more shot and his antagonist fell. At this moment one of our men rode up
and the wounded man was left in his care. The fight ended, Captain Dickison on inquiry learned that Colonel
Wilcoxson was not among the prisoners. He looked in the direction he had left the wounded officer and saw
him approaching, leaning upon the arm of the young guard, who called to Captain Dickison that Colonel
Wilcoxson desired to see him. He dismounted to meet him, with an emotion that stirs the heart of every brave
man, for the bravest are the tenderest, and addressed him, "Colonel, why did you throw your life away?" The
colonel with true manhood replied, "Do not blame yourself. You are only doing your duty as a soldier. I alone
am to blame." Dr. Williams, our noble surgeon, soon came up and greeted the unfortunate officer as a brother
united by the "mystic tie" He was faithfully ministered to by true and brave hearts until his ear was deaf to earth's
rude alarms and the weary spirit peacefully departed to its eternal rest.

The victory was a decided and brilliant one. The entire command was captured, about 75 in number, except 4
killed, also their wagon train, with ten fine wagons, each with six mules and horses, with best equipments, all
loaded with sea island cotton that had been stored at Braddock's farm, and all of their fine cavalry horses. Not
a man was hurt on our side.

Captain Dickison was then about 10 miles from the river, and up to this time had heard nothing of Lieutenant
McCardell's command, which had left three days previous, with instructions to meet our detachment at or near
this place. Considerable anxiety prevailed in regard to their safety, increased by the great difficulty to be met in
making a successful crossing of the river. But he moved on for about 3 miles, when night coming on, a halt was
ordered and a detachment of four men was sent on to Horse landing to order the flatboat brought over by the
time he would reach the landing next morning. [128] Before crossing the river, he had directed Captain
McGahaghan, who was at Horse landing with an infantry company of reserves for the purpose of removing the
machinery of the gunboat Columbine, to be ready to assist him when he returned from his expedition. Early next
morning on arriving at the landing the boat was found ready. The position was a very critical one. It was
apprehended that the enemy would soon follow with a large force to cut them off an almost impenetrable
swamp to the right and the St. John's in front giving them the advantage. This called forth all the resources of the
leader to plan the successful accomplishment of so dangerous a transportation. He sent a scout 8 miles in his
rear to watch the enemy's movements. He fully understood, should Lieutenant McCardell come up, there would
be about 250 men and over 200 horses, with ten heavily loaded wagons and two ambulances, to be moved
across the St. John's river by means of one flatboat, with capacity to carry one wagon or twelve men and
horses. Fortunately the infantry company of about 70 men on the opposite shore would render valuable
assistance in unloading each transport. He then made a detail of three detachments, sufficiently strong to
manage the boat and respectively take command.

At 10 o'clock a. m. they began their difficult and arduous task. The prisoners were first sent over, then the
captured wagons and horses, until all were safely landed. Day and night these dauntless men worked with such
caution and accuracy that not a mistake was made, either in loading or discharging. The boat was never
stopped until the last man, horse and wagon were safely landed on the west side of the St. John's river. While
this was going on a courier reported that Lieutenant McCardell and command were all safe and would soon be
up. On their arrival they gave most efficient help to our tired men who had so often crossed and re-crossed the
river in performance of their arduous and perilous duty. By 11 [129] o'clock the next morning, a period of 25
hours, the last boat, bearing Captain Dickison, landed, greeted by repeated shouts of welcome. After ten days
from the time Dickison left his headquarters he returned with his proud command, all rejoicing over their brilliant
victory, and feeling richly rewarded for the dangers and privations they had experienced by the assurance that
the loyal citizens on the east side of the river, who had lived in constant dread of raiding parties, would now
enjoy a happy security from their merciless enemies, who were now restrained in their vandalism by the brilliant
and signal successes of our gallant and intrepid men in every expedition they had ventured upon in that section
of country.

Wilcoxon's Sword
"ST. AUGUSTINE, FLA., March 23, 1865. " Captain J. J. Dickison:
"SIR: I have heard that you are a most kind and honorable gentleman and a Freemason. Believing this to be a
fact, I, as the widow of an honored Mason and brave soldier, appeal to you for a great favor.

" The sword which my husband, the late Lieutenant- Colonel Wilcoxon, wore at the time of his capture by you,
was presented to him by his brothers of the " Mystic Tie," members -of St. John's lodge, of Norwalk, Conn., in
token of the high esteem in which they held him. If you are a Mason, you will understand the value which he
placed upon the gift, and why I so strongly desire to possess it, in order that I may re-present it to the lodge.

"Is it possible for you to return it to me? or, if it has passed out of your immediate possession, can you in any
way effect the restoration of it to me? The centennial celebration of the St. John's lodge takes place in May
next. Earnest have been the entreaties from the brotherhood that the colonel would make an effort to be with
them at that time. He will be present with them at that time in spirit, without doubt. What would I not give to be
able to place in their hands the sword which, though it passed from my husband's hands in such a manner, has
never been dishonored ! Yours respectfully,
" MRS. ALBERT H. WILCOXON."

'CAMP BAKER, WALDO, FLA., March 31, 1865. "Mrs. Albert H. Wilcoxon, St. Augustine, Fla.:
" MADAM : I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 23d instant, which reached me a
few days ago by flag of truce.

" Previous to the receipt of your letter, at the request of your husband, I had concluded to send you the sword
which was worn by him at the time of his capture. It is unusual, in time of war, to return captures of this
description, but, in this instance, I will deviate from that course, on account of the feelings I entertained for your
husband as a brave officer. With this, I send you his sword, trusting that it may reach you safely.
" I am, madam, yours respectfully,
"J. J. DICKISON, " Captain Commanding Forces."

(Editor's note: The sword is still at the Wilcoxon's Lodge in Ct.)

Allen Peck's Letter on the events leading up to Braddock's farm
He was stationed at Picolata, wrote to his brother dated February 5, 1865:

Our camp has been full of excitement yesterday and today for this reason--"Dickison" (the commander of the
Reb forces in this vicinity on the opposite side of the St. John's river) made a raid on the country between here
and St. Augustine early yesterday morning; and succeeded in capturing 14 enlisted men and two Commissioned
officers belonging to our regiment, Beside a number of citizens and deserters from the rebel army---& portions
of his force came within four miles of our camp, and captured a deserter and a number of citizens and came
very near capturing the Captain commanding this post. The Captain was notified of the affair early yesterday
morning by a woman at whose house one of the deserters had been captured, she coming into camp and giving
the alarm as soon as possible. The Captain at once had a horse saddled, and taking three men with him started
for a citizen's house about 7 miles from camp-he had nearly got to his destination when he met the citizens he
was going to see, who informed him that a rebel force numbered almost 150 men under the immediate
command of "Col. Dickison". Upon learning the force of the rebs he concluded he shouldn't go any farther-but
started back for camp-and was headed for 12 rebs lay in ambush about 2 or 3 hundred yards further down the
road; and captured the citizen who gave to give the information in a few minutes after he left the Captain.

The woman who gave the alarm in camp only saw some Rebs from her house, and supposed there were no
more---so the Captain thought he might scout them-but he had a narrow escape. A number of citizens who
were captured were released by "Dickison" early this morning and were allowed to return to their houses after
having been taken about 25 miles from home. They report that the rebs intended to have made an attack on this
post early yesterday morning and were encamped within two miles of the post---learning that there was a
dance at a citizens house about 12 or 14 miles from here they concluded to go there instead of coming here.

They captured a Capt and Lt. from this post, and ambulance with 8 or 9 men from St. Augustine among whom
were 4 or 5 members of our string band who had their instruments with them having come out to play at the
party. They got a number of deserters.

Another View from Esther Hill Hawks Diary
The sad news is brought to us that the ten government teams which left St. Augustine under the escort of about
forty men and the Lt. Col of the 17 Conn. were captured after a desperate resistance from our men by
Dickinson's band of 200 cavalry. Col. Wilcoxson was seriously wounded as was the Adj. who was most
brutally murdered and buried on the spot. It was only four miles out from the city and since, the body has been
exhumed. It was found buried in a hole about one and one half feet deep and three feet long, the body bent
double and crowded in and the skull broken and face terribly disfigured.

Poor Chatfield! Little more than a boy! Cultivated, refined and amiable! Every one loved him! Only a week
before, he, full of life versed every part of the old Ft. with me, pointing out what had been and still being done
to make Ft. Marion one of the strongest and best defences in the world. He gathered flowers for us, which
were growing far up the wall, and in every way, did all in his power, for our comfort and amusement-and now
his terrible death thrills us with horror.

From the Florida Union - March 18, 1865
D
eath of Lieut-Colonel Wilcoxson - It becomes a painful duty to announce the death of Lieut. Col. Albert H.
Wilcoxson, Seventeenth Connecticut Volunteers, which occurred at Tallahassee some ten days ago, from the
effects of wounds received in a recent engagement near St. Augustine. Lieut. Col. Wilcoxson was a resident of
Norwalk, Conn. He took an active part in raising the regiment to which he belonged. He entered it as first
lieutenant, was soon made adjutant and after some month's service in that capacity was promoted to a captain.
In both these positions he served with distinction in the campaigns in Virginia. Shortly after the regiment was
ordered to this department he was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel. It is a little singular that this is the third
officer of that rank that has fallen in battle since the organization of the regiment, a little more than two years
ago. The intelligence will be received with profound sorrow in the community in which he resided where he was
held in the highest esteem by all who knew him.

(Editor's note: His body was returned and buried in Norwalk Ct for burial.)


Captain Wilson French's account, who was captured during the ambush. He gave the following account on
the evening of June 19, 1886 in the parlor of his Stratford, Connecticut house:

"In a town near Lake George, in Florida, was some cotton stored. Some of the citizens (called crackers), were
stealing and selling it to the merchants in St. Augustine, Fla. The General in command issued an order to Lt.
Col. Wilcoxson to capture that cotton if he thought it practical. Upon the strength of this Lt. Col. Wilcoxson
called for a detail of 10 & drivers, & 31 men from the 17th regiment, then he gave orders to me to issue no
passes to anyone to go outside the city on the day before the raid was to start. On February 3, 1865, the detail
left St. Augustine about 5:0 AM for a 3 days raid. Wm. Mensher, a citizen of St. Augustine, acted as guide.
This same day Capt. Henry Allen, issued passes to some of the boys, to attend a ball in the evening On the way
out, raiding party stopped at several places along the road & gathered up some cotton. On the way back Col.
Wilcoxson ordered me to go out a little ways from the main road, to a cotton gin, & get some very fine cotton
(the best I ever saw) & after I get it loaded report back in the road again and wait till the rest of the train comes
up. After returning to the road they found they were obliged to stay out one night longer than they had
expected, so removed the cotton from one wagon & loaded it on to others, leaving it empty. While reloading it
with corn for their horses, the rest of the train was moving on, under the command of Capt. Betts, & was in
advance of the train. Wilcoxson, me & Adjt. Chatfield were at the corn crib dismounted. The first they knew
that there were any rebs near by, they heard a volley of musketry, & soon as we could we mounted our horses
& started for the head of the train on a yell. The rebs thought it was cavalrymen so went for the swamp. Some
of their horses (rebs) were wounded, then our officers tried to rally the men, while the rebs came up to battle a
second time & to a hand to hand fight. The battle was fought on a (knoll), with swamps on either side. As
Wilcoxson, Chatfield, and me came up on one side of the knoll, the rebs went down on the other side. During
this hand to hand fight Adjt. Chatfield was on his horse & wounded and fell from his horse & was pounded, &
died almost instantly. He spoke only two words, Don't, Don't & this was when he was being pounded. My
horse was wounded in the fore shoulder and became unmanageable. Capt. Dickison's surgeon told me that he
meant to kill me and supposed he had when I fell from my horse. The second time that I was thrown from my
horse I was carried under a tree, and when I fell one of Dickison's men (an Irishman) struck me over the head
with the butt of his gun & thought I was the head officer & asked some of my company if I was not. I think that
Wilcoxson was poisoned, for I always understood the rebel surgeon said that he would fix him. I left
Andersonville to return to our lines on March 20th, & about the 25th Dickison told me while at Baldwin at the
picket line with a flag of truce to give Wilcoxon's wife his sword and belt. He was also detained about 6 weeks
at Lake City. About 250 rebs attacked the train. Ben F. Brinkenhoff (of Company G) was clerk for me at St.
Augustine & sent me $10.00, some socks, & a pair of pants, but some rebs got them all instead of me."

Regimental historian William Warren's Account,
"On February 2, 1865, Wilcoxson started out with 35 or 40 men, and five teams and wagons to go to Spring
Garden where it was reported was a lot of cotton. There was no false alarm this time. The cotton was there,
secured and started on their return to St. Augustine. Co. A did not go this time, being at
Picolata with three
other companies of the regiment. So I am indebted to one of the comrades who was of the party and escaped
capture and is at present a member of the Soldier's Home at Noroton Heights. The expedition was on their
return February 5th. They had reached a point about 21 miles from St. Augustine, a place called Dunn's Lake,
and halted for dinner at the house of a citizen nearby. Wilcoxson and Chatfield were having dinner in the house
(Chatfield accompanied the party just for pleasure to see the country). The men were lounging the time away,
when suddenly, a party of guerrillas, a hundred or more, in command of Col. Dickison, appeared on the scene
and demanded the surrender of the whole party. Some firing was had to enforce the demand, and hearing the
firing Wilcoxson and Chatfield rushed out, mounted their horses and prepared to fight. Soon the Col. found
himself face to face with Dickson, the leader, and after emptying his revolver fell exhausted from his horse from
several wounds, and he was a prisoner. Chatfield also encountered one of the lieutenants and a fierce hand to
hand contest ensued at the end of which he, too, fell exhausted and when prostrate on the ground the rebel
demanded his surrender. "Never while I live" was his heroic answer, and a soldier brained him where he lay!!!
Of the number who went on the raid, but three escaped capture. They took to the brush, and secreted
themselves till it was safe to venture out, and made their way to St. Augustine and gave the alarm. The Lt. Col.
was taken to Tallahassee, where he died in a few days. It was believed by many that it was a put up job to get
as many officers and men as possible to go after the cotton, and then surprise them in the manner they did.

The loss of these two officers was a great blow to the Regt. Wilcoxson was a brilliant man. He was the first
Adjt. on the organization of the Regt., subsequently promoted to be Capt. of Co. I, and later to be Lt. Col.
succeeding Fowler in that position. Chatfield was a remarkable bright young man, scarce 20 years of age. He
left his college course to enlist as a private in Co. D. The Col. soon take him as his personal secretary, and
soon he was made Sgt. Major, and at Chancellorsville was promoted 1st Lt. for meritorious conduct in saving
the colors when the color bearer was shot down, and at the close of the campaign appointed to Adjutant.
Major Henry Allen then became Lt. Col. and with the detachment at Picolata was recalled to St. Augustine, our
place filled with colored troops, so after nearly 6 months of the best times in the whole 3 years of service, we
bade farewell to Picolata."

From Col. William H. Noble's History of the 17th Regiment
Soon after this Gen. Hatch was succeeded in command by Gen. Scammon, and all raids abandoned except a
miserable one which resulted most disastrously to the regiment. Gen. Scammon had learned of a lot of cotton
stored on the borders of Dunn's Lake, and directed Col. Wilcoxson, with teams and a sufficient force, to gather
it in. The order was obeyed and the cotton gathered. The force was about started on its return home when it
was attacked by about two hundred of Dixon's Mounted Rifles. The attack was sudden and unexpected. They
are easily made so in Florida, which is pretty much all one pine wood.

A summons to surrender was unheeded by Col. Wilcoxson, and fire opened. Seeing no hope of escape,
Lieut.-Col. Wilcoxson and Adj. Chatfield attempted to cut their way through the enemy. Adj. Chatfield was
instantly killed, and Col. Wilcoxson shot through the shoulder, of which wound he afterwards died at
Tallahassee. The regiment in these officers lost two gallant and able men. Two captains and about fifty men
were captured and sent to Andersonville.

Records of Captured 17th Soldiers:
Company A:
Sergeant
CROWE, John M. Residence: Norwalk, enlisted July 14, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

Private
NORTHRUP, Seth A. Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Wd. July 1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Cap'd
Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

Company C:

Captain
QUIEN, Henry Residence: Danbury, enlisted Aug. 25, 1862. Must. 2nd Lt. Wd. July 2,'63, Gettysburg, Pa.
Pro. 1st Lt. July 15,'63; Captain Aug. 15,'64. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Released Apr. 21,'65.
Discharged May 15,'65.

Private
MORRIS, Theodore S. Residence: Danbury, enlisted July 31, 1862. Cap'd July 1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Par.
Aug. 29,'63. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fa. Par. Apr. 28,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

WILCOX, Charles H. Residence: Danbury, enlisted July 23, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla.
Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

Company D:

Musician
WILMOTT, Frederick M. Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted July 24, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine,
Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

Private
MOTT, Joseph Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted July 23, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

Company F:

Private
BULGER, John Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Aug. 9, 1862. Wd. July--,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Cap'd Feb.
5,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

Company G:

Musicians
SMITH, Sherman H. Residence: Ridgefield, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla.
Par. Apr. 20,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

Company I:

Sergeant
INGERSOLL, Oliver S. Residence: Greenwich, enlisted Aug. 7, 1862. Must. Corp. Cap'd May 2,'63,
Chancellorsville, Va. Par. May 15,'63. Pro. July 1,'64. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65.
Discharged June 8,'65.

Company K:

1st Lieut
RUGGLES, George B. Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted Aug. 15, 1862. Must. Sergt. Pro. 2nd Lt. Nov.
1,'63; 1st Lt. Apr. 3,'64. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged May 15,'65.

Musician
AINSCOW, James Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted July 6, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 4,'65, St. Augustine, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 1,'65.


                                           Captured at Braddock's Farm

Company B:

Private
WHITNEY, Morando H. Residence: Darien, enlisted Aug. 9, 1862. Wd. July 2,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Cap'd
Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Released Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

Company D:

Corporal
CARPENTER, Frederick H. Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted July 23, 1862. Must. Priv. Pro. Nov. 15,'62.
Wd. July 1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Released Apr. 25,'65. Discharged June
8,'65.

Private
LEWIS, Stephen C. Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted Aug. 9, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 23,'65.

NORTON, Patrick Residence: New Canaan, enlisted Aug. 14, 1862. Wd. and cap'd July 1,'63, Gettysburg,
Pa. Par. July--,'63. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

TREADWELL, Edmund Residence: Redding, enlisted Aug. 12, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

WHITTLESEY, Samuel F. Residence: Trumbull, enlisted Aug. 8, 1862. Wd. July 1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa.
Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged July 10,'65

Company E:

Private
BRADLEY, Thomas Residence: Newtown, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Par. Apr. 28,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

Company F:

Captain
BETTS, C. Frederick Residence: Norwalk, enlisted July 18, 1862. Pro. from 2nd Lt. Co. A, Mar. 5,'64.
Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged May 17,'65.

Private
BROTHERTON, Ira M. Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Aug. 31, 1864. Transferred from Co. G, Nov.
21,'64. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

CARGILL, Charles Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Mar. 9, 1864. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

LAKE, George Residence: Roxbury, enlisted Dec. 30, 1863. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr.
21,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

LOUNSBERRY, James H. Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Aug. 13, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake,
Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 19,'65.

LOUNSBERRY, Joshua Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Aug. 22, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Par. Apr. 21,'65. Died June 23,'65.

WEED, Oscar Residence: Norwalk, enlisted Aug. 9, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr.
21,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

Company G:

Captain
FRENCH, Wilson Residence: Stratford, enlisted Aug. 1, 1862. Must. 1st Lt. Pro. May 8,'63. Wd. July 1,'63,
Gettysburg, Pa. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged May 26,'65.

Corporal
BETTS, C. Frederick Residence: Norwalk, enlisted July 18, 1862. Pro. from 2nd Lt. Co. A, Mar. 5,'64.
Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged May 17,'65.

Privates
ALBIN, Sylvester Residence: New Canaan, enlisted Sept. 1, 1864. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 23,'65.

BAKER, Samuel B. Residence: Westport, enlisted Aug. 18, 1864. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged July 7,'65.

COSTELLO, Martin Residence: Redding, enlisted Aug. 4, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

FERRY, George S. Residence: Bethel, enlisted Aug. 6, 1864. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr.
21,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

JARVIS, John J. Residence: Ridgefield, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Cap'd July 2,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Par. Aug.
2,'63. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 28,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

MERRITT, William M. Residence: Ridgefield, enlisted Sept. 1, 1862. Wd. May 2,'63, Chancellorsville, Va.
Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 28,'65. Discharged June 14,'65.

NORTHROP, Warner H. Residence: Bethel, enlisted Sept. 2, 1864. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Par. Apr. 28,'65. Discharged July 10,'65.

Company H:

Corporal
REMINGTON, Seth Residence: New Canaan, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Must. Priv. Wd. and cap'd July
1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Par. Aug. 25,'63. Pro. Sept. 27,'63. Wd. and cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Released Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

Private
ALBIN, Henry Residence: Wilton, enlisted Aug. 13, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Discharged
June 8,'65. M.O. July 19,'65.

BARTON, Charles L. Residence: New Canaan, enlisted Dec. 29, 1863. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake,
Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

BENEDICT, Enoch B. Residence: Sharon, enlisted Mar. 1, 1864. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par.
Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 3,'65.

BRODHURST, Alfred Z. Residence: Stamford, enlisted July 29, 1862. Wd. and cap'd May 2,'63,
Chancellorsville, Va. Par. May 15,'63. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June
23,'65.

BURTIS, Warren J. Residence: Bridgeport, enlisted Aug. 30, 1862. Wd. July 1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Cap'd
Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Released Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

JONES, David R. Residence: Wilton, enlisted Sept. 20, 1864. (substitute or drafted) Cap'd Feb. 5,'65,
Dunn's Lake, Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 10,'65.

MALLETT, Charles S. Residence: Easton, enlisted Sept. 1, 1862. Wd. and cap'd July 1,'63, Gettysburg,
Pa. Par. Aug. 2,'63. Transferred to Co. F, 1st Regt. VRC Oct. 28,'63. Re-transferred Oct. 25,'64. Cap'd
Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla. Released Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.

SMALLHORN, James A. Residence: New Canaan, enlisted Sept. 1, 1862. Cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake,
Fla. Par. Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8, '65.

REMINGTON, Seth Residence: New Canaan, enlisted Aug. 11, 1862. Must. Priv. Wd. and cap'd July
1,'63, Gettysburg, Pa. Par. Aug. 25,'63. Pro. Sept. 27,'63. Wd. and cap'd Feb. 5,'65, Dunn's Lake, Fla.
Released Apr. 21,'65. Discharged June 8,'65.
Captain James J. Dickison CSA
Adjutant H. Whitney Chatfield

His body was buried in Bridgeport, Ct.
Later the
white Grand Army of the
Republic unit in St. Augustine would be
named after him.
Lieut. Col Albert Wilcoxon
17th Conn.
Killed by Dickison
Lieut. Henry Quinn - Company C.
Captured by Dickison
Lieut. George B. Ruggles -
Company K
Captured by Dickison
Private Stephen Lewis - Company D
Captured by Dickison
Picture of the "Swamp Fox of the
Confederacy" J J Dickison as an
older man
Custom Search
Like us on
Facebook